Architecture · Photography · Travel

Friday photo: turf roofs

A cobblestoned street, with turf-roofed wooden houses and an old-fashioned street lamp, in the old part of Tórshavn, the Faroe Islands. The islands get a lot of rain (it rains on 300 days of the year, apparently) and turf roofs provide insulation and protection from the very wet weather. Roofs like these have been a feature of the Faroes for over 1000 years.

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Turf roofs and cobblestones, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands.
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Architecture · Photography · Scotland

Friday photo: clever construction

While out for a walk at Murton Farm nature reserve in the county of Angus last month, I passed an interestingly constructed dry stone wall. The first photo shows a section with a large boulder at the bottom and flatter stones placed around it at different angles. In the second picture you can see more of the wall, with another smaller boulder to the left of the big one. Scotland has a lot of dry stone walls made with no ‘glue’ to hold the stones together, but I don’t think I’ve ever seen one quite like this before.

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Section of an unusual dry stone wall at Murton Farm nature reserve, Angus. 
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Dry stone wall at Murton Farm with two boulders at the bottom.
Architecture · Garden · Photography · Scotland

Friday photo: roof relaxation

This is the roof garden at New Lanark World Heritage Site. Roof gardens are not a common sight in Scotland and this one is apparently the largest in the country. It houses a water feature, several sculptures and a variety of plants. New Lanark village contains extensive old mill buildings that have been turned into a large exhibition area. It’s a fascinating place to visit but there’s a lot to take in. After being bombarded with information downstairs, the roof garden supplies a wonderful sense of peace and calm.

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The relaxing roof garden at New Lanark World Heritage Site.
Architecture · Fife · Photography · Scotland

Friday photo: cobbles

A cobbled lane in the conservation village of Culross, in Fife. Walking round Culross (pronounced Koo-ross) is like stepping back in time. Many of the old walls and buildings date back to the 16th and 17th Centuries and there are lots of little lanes and curious features to be discovered.

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A cobbled lane in the Fife village of Culross.
Architecture · Photography · Scotland

Friday photo: stone carving

Shown below is the elaborate and beautifully carved stone archway into the small and secluded burial chapel of the Maxwell family at Monreith, Wigtownshire. The last Maxwell to be buried here was Sir Herbert Maxwell, grandfather of the writer and naturalist, Gavin Maxwell (best known for his book ‘Ring of bright water’). There are some interesting old gravestones in the graveyard surrounding the chapel and the whole place has a pleasantly peaceful feel to it.

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Carved archway into the Maxwell family burial chapel at Monreith, Wigtownshire.